Participants

  • Lisa Baldez (Associate Professor of Political Science and Latin American, Latino and Caribbean Studies, Dartmouth College) is the author of Why Women Protest: Women’s Movements in Chile (Cambridge, 2002), which examines the conditions under which women mobilize on the basis of their gender identity. She is the author, with Lee Epstein and Andrew Martin, of “Does the U.S. Constitution Still Need an ERA?” forthcoming in The Journal of Legal Studies. Her current research focuses on candidate nominations and gender quotas in Latin America. She is the founding editor (with Karen Beckwith) of Politics & Gender.
  • Lee Ann Banaszak (Associate Professor of Political Science and Women’s Studies, Pennsylvania State University) writes on comparative women’s movements and the determinants of feminist attitudes among the mass public in the U.S. and Europe. She is author of Why Movements Succeed or Fail: Opportunity, Culture and the Struggle for Woman Suffrage (Princeton, 1996), and editor of two books including Women’s Movements Facing the Reconfigured State with Karen Beckwith and Dieter Rucht (Cambridge, 2003). Her current research examines movement activists within government and their effect on the U.S. women’s movement.
  • Karen Beckwith (Professor of Political Science, College of Wooster) teaches mass politics, political parties and political movements; her research focuses on comparative women, gender, and politics. She is founding editor (with Lisa Baldez) of Politics & Gender. Her books include Women’s Movements Facing the Reconfigured State (Cambridge, 2003; with Lee Ann Banaszak and Dieter Rucht), and American Women and Political Participation (Greenwood, 1986). Her work on women’s movements and gender has been published in the European Journal of Political Research, Politics & Society, Signs, and West European Politics, among others. She is a former president of the APSA Women and Politics Research Section.
  • Nancy Burns’ (Warren E. Miller Professor of Political Science, University of Michigan) current work focuses on gender, race, public opinion, and political action and on the relationship between states and cities. Her publications include The Formation of American Local Governments (Oxford, 1994) and The Private Roots of Public Action (Harvard, 2001). Burns served as Principal Investigator of the National Election Studies from 1999-2005. She currently serves as Director of the Center for Political Studies at the University of Michigan. Burns is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
  • Kathleen Dolan’s (Professor of Political Science, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee) primary research and teaching interests are in the areas of elections, public opinion, and gender politics. She is the author of Voting for Women: How the Public Evaluates Women Candidates (Westview, 2004) as well as numerous book chapters and articles in the American Journal of Political Science, Political Research Quarterly, and Political Psychology, among others. Dolan is a current associate editor of Politics & Gender.
  • Suzanne Dovi ’s (Assistant Professor of Political Science and Philosophy, University of Arizona) research interests include democratic theory, representation (especially the representation of historically disadvantaged groups), feminist theory, and normative concepts like hypocrisy and despair. Her work has appeared in the American Political Science Review, Constellations, the Journal of Politics, and Polity. She is currently writing a book entitled The Good Representative: The Virtues of Democratic Representation.
  • Kim Fridkin (Professor of Political Science, Arizona State University) has contributed articles to the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Politics, and the Journal of Politics. She is the co-author of No-Holds Barred: Negative Campaigning in U.S. Senate Campaigns (Prentice Hall, 2004), co-author of The Spectacle of U.S. Senate Campaigns (Princeton, 1999, and the author of The Political Consequences of Being a Woman (Columbia, 1996). Professor Fridkin’s current research interests are negative campaigning, women and politics, and civic engagement.
  • Jane Junn’s (Associate Professor of Political Science, Rutgers University) primary interests are political participation and elections in the U.S., political behavior and attitudes among American minorities and immigrants, theories of democracy, survey research, and social science methodology. Her research has been supported by the Russell Sage Foundation, CIRCLE, the National Science Foundation, the Social Science Research Council, the Spencer Foundation, and the Educational Testing Service. She is the author of New Race Politics: Understanding Minority and Immigrant Politics (edited with Kerry Haynie, Cambridge, forthcoming), Education and Democratic Citizenship in America (with Norman Nie and Ken Stehlik-Barry, Chicago, 1996) which won the Woodrow Wilson Foundation Book Award from the APSA, and Civic Education: What Makes Students Learn (with Richard Niemi, Yale, 1998), along with articles and chapters on political participation. She is currently at work on a book on race and political participation in the U.S., with emphasis on the dynamics of immigration and racial diversity.
  • Jane Mansbridge (Adams Professor of Political Leadership and Democratic Values, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard) is the author of Beyond Adversary Democracy (Basic Books, 1980) and Why We Lost the ERA (Chicago, 1986), which was the co-recipient of the APSA’s Kammerer and Schuck Awards, and editor of Beyond Self-Interest (Chicago, 1990). Her current research includes work on representation, trust, the relation between coercion and deliberation in democracy, the public understanding of collective action problems, and the interaction between non-activists and social movements (the last derived from recent interviews with low-income women about feminism).
  • Eileen L. McDonagh’s (Associate Professor of Political Science, Northeastern University) areas of research include women and politics, reproductive rights, and American political development. She has received research support from the National Science Foundation and from a number of private foundations, including the AAUW Research Scholar Fellowship for 2004-2006. She is the author of Breaking the Abortion Deadlock: From Choice to Consent (Oxford, 1996). She is currently finishing book manuscripts focusing on sex equality in sports policies and a cross-national study of women’s political leadership patterns.
  • Suzanne Mettler’s (Alumni Associate Professor of Political Science, Cornell) research focuses on American political development, public policy, political behavior, gender and politics, and citizenship. She is the author of Dividing Citizens: Gender And Federalism In New Deal Public Policy (Cornell, 1998), which was awarded the Kammerer Award of the American Political Science Association for the best book on U.S. national policy, as well as a number of journal articles. Her forthcoming book, Civic Generation: The G.I. Bill in the Lives of World War II Veterans (Oxford, forthcoming) shows that the educational and training provisions of the G.I. Bill not only expanded access to social opportunity, but also prompted recipients to participate at higher levels in civic organizations and politics during the postwar era.
  • Beth Reingold’s (Associate Professor of Political Science and Women’s Studies, Emory University) principle research interest is the impact of women, gender, and feminism in American politics. Her book, Representing Women: Sex, Gender, and Legislative Behavior in Arizona and California (North Carolina, 2000) tests, and often challenges, widespread assumptions that women in public office will “make a difference” for women, as women. She has also written on feminist consciousness and identity politics in such journals as the Journal of Politics and Political Research Quarterly. Her current collaborate work examines the impact of diversity—especially in terms of race, ethnicity, and gender—in the American state legislatures.
  • Gretchen Ritter (Associate Professor of Government, University of Texas at Austin) specializes in studies of American politics and gender politics from a historical and theoretical perspective. She has published articles, reviews, and essays in numerous peer reviewed journals in law, political science, sociology, and women studies, and is the author of Goldbugs and Greenbacks: The Antimonopoly Tradition and the Politics of Finance in America (Cambridge, 1997) and of The Constitution as Social Design: Gender and Civic Membership in the American Constitutional Order (Stanford, 2006). She is Director of the Center for Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Texas.
  • Kira Sanbonmatsu (Associate Professor of Political Science, The Ohio State University) is the author of Where Women Run: Gender and Party in the American States (Michigan, forthcoming) and Democrats, Republicans, and the Politics of Women’s Place (Michigan, 2002). Her research concerns gender and politics, parties, public opinion, state politics, and race/ethnicity and has been published in journals including the American Journal of Political Science and the Journal of Politics.
  • Christina Wolbrecht (Associate Professor of Political Science and Director of the Program in American Democracy, University of Notre Dame) is the author of The Politics of Women’s Rights: Parties, Positions, and Change (Princeton, 2000), which received the 2001 Leon D. Epstein Outstanding Book Award from the Political Organizations and Parties Section of the APSA, and co-editor (with Rodney E. Hero) of The Politics of Democratic Inclusion (Temple, 2005). She is currently engaged in collaborative projects using new ecological inference techniques to investigate women’s voting behavior after suffrage, and examining the impact of female role models on the political intentions of adolescents.
  • Susan Welch (Dean of the College of the Liberal Arts and Professor of Political Science, The Pennsylvania State University) is a specialist in American politics, particularly urban, ethnic, and women’s politics. She is the author of nearly 150 scholarly articles and six books, two textbooks (including an American government textbook now in its tenth edition), and three edited collections. Her most recent books include Affirmative Action and Minority Enrollments: The Impact of Bakke on Medical and Law Schools (with John Gruhl, Michigan, 1998) and Race and Place: Residence and Race Relations in an American City (with Lee Sigelman, Tim Bledsoe, and Michael Combs, Cambridge, 2001). Her work has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Mental Health, and the National Institute of Justice.